How does the Lottery by Shirley Jackson relate to today’s society?

What is Shirley Jackson trying to say about society in The Lottery?

Through the lottery, Jackson shows us the natural acceptance of routine and ritual that pervade our lives. Because a tradition has always been carried out, we accept it without question, just as the citizens of Jackson’s small town accept the tradition of the lottery.

What social issues does The Lottery represent?

Jackson’s work examines the issues such as human cruelty, social sanctioning of violence, as well as marginalization leading to victimization. These themes encompass specific traditions, practices, and laws that lie at the heart of the work’s meaning.

What keeps a society or community together The Lottery?

The premise of the lottery is that someone selects the piece of paper to be stoned to death. … It is for this reason why the lottery prevents the breakdown of society in this community.

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What is the main point of The Lottery by Shirley Jackson?

The main point in “The Lottery” concerns the nature of tradition and how it affects generations of people. Since the titular Lottery has always been practiced, the townsfolk seem to consider it just a part of life, and expected instead of rationally considered.

What does The Lottery say about community?

In “The Lottery”, Shirley Jackson shows the theme of the violence within a small village through symbolism to show that even the most ordinary people can commit violence, which can eventually lead to killing innocent individuals.

What kind of society is in The Lottery?

The villagers of “The Lottery” live in an intensely patriarchal society. The anonymity of the village lends the story a sense of universality.

What could The Lottery represent?

The lottery represents any action, behavior, or idea that is passed down from one generation to the next that’s accepted and followed unquestioningly, no matter how illogical, bizarre, or cruel.

What is the issue in The Lottery?

The central conflict, or problem, in “The Lottery” is that the people blindly accept the traditions of their ancestors without questioning whether those practices are necessary in their own society. When the story opens, the townspeople seem to be gathering for a rather pleasant community event.

What tradition does The Lottery represent?

In a broad, general sense, the lottery system from the story represents old traditions that people blindly follow for the sake of following tradition. The people in the story do the lottery and the death by stoning because that’s what they have always done.

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What is the relationship between the characters and their society in the lottery?

society conflict exists when the rules or governance of the society come into conflict with the character. The character is threatened or impaired in some way by society. In this story, all characters are at conflict with society because the victim is chosen by lottery, but the Hutchinsons are the main conflict.

Why do the townspeople agree to take part in the lottery and turn against each other?

The lottery’s origins are steeped in the superstitious belief that one innocent villager must be sacrificed each year in order to increase the harvest yield. … Simply put, the villagers continue to participate in the lottery because it is a tradition.

Why do the people of the village go along with the lottery?

The reason why the villagers “have” to have a lottery is simply because the lottery had become a tradition that has been followed since the time of the villagers’ ancestors.